Garden

Growing Sansevieria: Tips for Thriving Snake Plants!

Want to know more about the Chuck Norris of plants? Let us introduce you to sansevieria; the snake plant.

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Sansevieria; also known as mother-in-law’s tongue is a tough-as-nails plant that can handle whatever life throws at it be it bad weather, low maintenance, or otherwise, but never let its toughness fool you as it is a real beauty still!

I-Perfect Spot for The Sansevieria:

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The goal is to provide ideal conditions to promote our plant’s growth. That is to say that we will try to get as close as possible to its environment of origin and its climatic conditions.

Therefore, the first rule is plenty of bright and indirect sunlight!

Place the plant near a source of light without exposing it directly to it, near a well-lit window, would be the ideal spot. As soon as you notice that the leaf is bent, you should understand that the light is not enough for it anymore.

II-Nutrition Wise:

The mother-in-law’s tongue can taste the slightest trace of nutrients in the soil. It is as mentioned earlier a plant that needs the bare minimum to go on and even thrive. It will simply handle anything and still come out looking sharp.

III-Hydration? Keep it in the Middle:

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Hydration is key to keeping that mother-in-law’s tongue from going dry! Just make sure that you offer it the right amount of water. Overwatering will certainly lead to root rot, and under watering will simply kill your plant. Just remember! Not too much and not too little either! Just enough to keep the plant looking healthy and beautiful.

IV-Maintenance? Never Easier:

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Would you like to know why it is easy? Simply because this plant requires almost 0 attention! You will care so little about it that it will start to look like a plastic plant to you.

Just stick to the below points when taking care of Sansevieria.

– Wipe down the leaves sometimes.

– Check the soil and keep it somewhere between dry and wet

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Published by
Jack Newman